Tuesday, June 7, 2011

New Release Tuesday, 7 June 2011

The first big release week of the summer season has some really good titles on offer. 

GENERAL FICTION

I'm particularly excited about these first two titles, both of which I've read and loved, and both of which I think will attract and speak to a wide range of readers. 


The first is State of Wonder by Ann Patchett. Patchett's latest follows fortyish medical researcher Marina Singh on her journey into the heart of the Amazon jungle. Truly a wondrous read! Click here for the review.

Next up, The Borrower, a first novel from Rebecca Makkai. Lucy Hull, a young librarian in a fictional version of Hannibal, Missouri, finds herself on an improbable adventure as the reluctant kidnapper of a precocious young library patron. A sweet story with a bit of a bite, The Borrower is perfect both as a summer beach read and as a book club selection. Click here for the review.


Juan Gabriel Vasquez' The Secret History of Costaguana is literary fiction inspired by Joseph Conrad's Nostromo. Kirkus Reviews says, "To read this novel is to enter a Borgesian rabbit hole—it’s a fiction that purports to tell the truth obscured by another fiction—yet its strangeness helps make it both brave and engaging." Click here for the full review.
American original Kurt Vonnegut finally gets an official admission to the canon with this handsome Library of America volume of his novels and stories (1963-1973). It's about time!


And two novels for the book group set, Joy for Beginners by Erica Bauermeister and South of Superior by Ellen Airgood.


MYSTERY/HORROR/SCIENCE FICTION
This week sees new titles from a couple of bestselling hardhitters.

Clive Cussler, writing with Grant Blackwood, gives us The Kingdom, a Fargo adventure. And Laurell K. Hamilton, bless her heart, presents the twentieth Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter novel, Hit List. Wow.



In the realm of the somewhat less known, Simon R. Green's back with his fifth Eddie Drood, For Heaven's Eyes Only. Whether you call his work supernatural noir, or urban fantasy, you'll definitely call it fun.

Oh my word. I had to tear myself away from reading this terrifying and all-too-believable post-apocalyptic novel (with the admittedly terrible name and cover) to finish this post. I picked it up because Stephen King included it in his annual summer reading list in Entertainment Weekly's last issue, and Uncle Stevie has taste very similar to my own. It's better than all that! Don't let the cover or title keep you away from this book, if you have any interest at all in post-apocalyptic/dystopian literature. You won't be disappointed!

JUVENILE/YOUNG ADULT



This week sees the release of John Grisham's second mystery for the intermediate reader set, Theodore Boone: The Abduction. And then there's the third installment of the Dork Diaries, fun for fans of the Wimpy Kid and Big Nate.



And two for the Twilight set, Alyson Noel's Everlasting, the sixth novel of the Immortals series, and Hereafter by Tara Hudson (about which I know nothing, but isn't the cover dreamy?)


NONFICTION
The title says it all.


If you've reviewed any recent (or upcoming) releases I'd love to read them--please link them up below. 





And now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to return to my action-packed novel of doom. Cheers!

1 comment:

EnriqueFreeque said...

Shoot. I missed a "linky". Do send me a reminder next time you have one in case I get swamped again and don't stay current with your blog like I should. Would love to submit something from the vaults.

Btw, how's The Sheep Look Up going for you?